G: Drive : Boomer :: FILR : Millenial

Don’t worry about Generation X. No one does.

The G: Drive was (and is) the name given to a portion of a shared network drive at HFC. It gets its name from the fact that when you log into a computer on campus it usually maps to the part of the shared drive to the drive name G:. In contrast the portion of the shared drive that just has your files is called H:. A bonus explanation at the end of the article explains what a K: drive is.

You can get at those remotely. The easiest way is to use FILR. Using FILR the G: and H: drives will look like they are on your local computer.

This shows some of the file system of a computer including a file called filr displaying g: drive contents
FILR looks like it is running locally.

To get FILR:

  1. Go to the Portal at my.hfcc.edu
  2. Select the blue bar that reads ALL HFC WEB APPLICATION SYSTEMS
  3. Select “Filr Network Drive Access (H: and K: drive) – access your files and files on the shared K drive.”
  4. Download and install the FILR WINDOWS CLIENT. There is a tiny link to “Other Client Downloads” that mentions OS X, but I have not tried it. If you install this on a Mac I wish you well.
A picture of the landing screen at HFCC after you click H or K drive. It shows where to download FILR

Everytime you log into the computer it will ask for a password. If you give it you are connected to the files. You can safely ignore it if you do not think you need G: or H: drive access.

So, what was a K: drive, you ask? The H: and K: drives used to be separate then they got merged. One was for classroom computer desktops (K:) and one was for office computer desktops (H:). Networks were strange back in the day. Now go ask your grandparents about FTP clients.

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